Religious instruction getting into public schools – through the outside

Ohio last year approved a bill allowing high school students to receive up to two units of academic credit for instruction outside the public school classroom. Students can get credit for religious instruction as long as no public funds or publicly paid personnel are involved and they're not taught in public school buildings. The Center for Investigative Reporting, now found at the website revealnews.org has an update of what's going on around the country when it comes to "religious release" programs. Continue Reading

America’s Vanishing Worker Protections

Since 2003, more than 30 states - including Ohio - either have cut workers' compensation benefits or made it harder for injured workers to qualify for benefits. That's according to a just-released series of stories by ProPublica non-profit investigative news organization and National Public Radio. The story was published just as the Occupational Safety and Health Administration issued a report saying that, on average, workers comp pays only 20% of the cost of workers' injuries and illnesses in the United States. Workers pay half the cost out -of-pocket and the rest is paid by private insurance and other government funding sources. In Ohio, workers' comp benefit cuts came in the mid-2000s, when laws were passed raising the burden of proof for employees when an injury aggravated an existing condition, and lowering the "life" of claims to automatically close cases five years after the last medical treatment, making it difficult to receive payment if an injury recurs. Continue Reading

National donors pick the winners in state elections, including Ohio’s

The biggest donor to state elections in November was the Republic Governors Association, which spent $68.6 million, according to a data compiled by the Center for Public Integrity. The Ohio Republican Party got $9 million of that pot, with $3 million directed to Gov. Kasich’s re-election campaign. Mike DeWine, who won re-election as Ohio’s Attorney General, received $1.3 million from the RGA. In contrast the Democratic Governors’ Association spent $32 million on state races in November. Kasich’s opponent, former Cuyahoga County executive, did not receive donations from the Democratic association. Continue Reading

The Great Ohio Death Drug Mystery

On Monday, Jan. 20, four death-row inmates in Ohio filed a motion in U.S. District Court in Columbus challenging the law that shields the names of companies that provide lethal injection drugs to the state in death penalty cases.  This comes at a time when Ohio is changing the drugs it uses after a botched execution in 2014. The Marshall Project, a non-profit news organization that covers criminal justice issues, reports that an alternative drug that Ohio is considering is hard to come by - and its source may never be known under the state's secrecy law. The piece was reported and written by Maurice Chammah. You can follow the Marshall Project on Facebook or Twitter. Continue Reading

Military “gifts” to Ohio cities total $73 million

Mine-resistant,  ambush-protected military vehicles: not your ordinary community police cars, but equipment several small towns in Ohio now own, thanks to the Unites States military. Local police departments for the past 20 years have been obtaining military equipment under a Pentagon surplus give-away program called 1033. Ohio cities such as Brimfield, Canton, Brunswick and Barberton are among the 600 municipalities across the country that have acquired so-called MRAP’s , designed to detect improved explosive devises,  valued at around $733,000 each, from the U.S. Department of Defense. That’s according to the Marshall Project, a non-profit news organization that has compiled a data base of 1033 recipients from the DOD’s quiet release of the information last month. Ohio cities, county sheriff’s department, campus police departments and local offices of the FBI have received more than $73 million under the 1033 Program. Continue Reading